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Finding should be celebrated

By Letter to the Editor
Seattle Times

A letter to the editor: "I couldn’t be happier to hear about the Teanaway wolf pack, and the presence of a lactating female."

In February, wolves from Washington state’s first wolf pack (since the 1930s) were poached. As a native species, wolves belong in and are critical to the health of Washington’s wilderness. I couldn’t be happier to hear about the Teanaway wolf pack, and the presence of a lactating female [“Wolf pack found near Cle Elum,” page one, July 6].

Wolves are an endangered species. When top-of-the-food-chain predators like wolves are removed from an ecosystem, the entire food web suffers. The natural balance between predator and prey is destroyed — this has far more threatening consequences to humanity than wolves do.

It took organizations and individuals who understand wolves’ importance to protect their habitat and wait for their return. It is truly incredible to know that wolves, which were almost poached to extinction, found their way back to Washington state. Still, wolves need to be protected. As February’s poaching indicates, wolves remain misunderstood and in danger of being killed.

I am an environmental journalism student at Western Washington University. I believe if people learned about the critical role wolves play in Washington state, they would be celebrated instead of despised or feared.

If it weren’t for wolves, we wouldn’t have “man’s best friend.”

— Sarah Smith, Bellingham

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