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Letter: Nonlethal ranching part of solution

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By Letter to the editor: Angela Crane
The Vancouver Columbian

As proved by [rancher] Patton, Oregon and Washington ranchers and wolves can coexist, and almost 75 percent of our state's citizens want them here. Cheers to nonlethal ranching, wolves in our northern states, and the Endangered Species Act.

Coexisting with wolves in Washington state must incorporate nonlethal wolf management tools to satisfy the 74.5 percent of Washingtonians who want viable wolf populations on our landscape. A March 5 Columbian story reported, "Oregon's no-kill wolf policy yields lower cow deaths."

While gunshots, fladry fencing and additional miles on one's ATV might not be a "sure cure" to scare off wolves, Wallowa County's Karl Patton is a progressive cattle rancher who is commended for his nonlethal efforts to reduce wolf conflict.

Just as life in suburbs has evolved into more streetlights, houses stand on once-vacant lots, and strip malls are poised in areas where cows once grazed, the Old West option for shooting wolves on sight is no longer acceptable practice to the majority of citizens who live here. In a state that's home to a mere 51 wolves, we should celebrate the presence of wolves both as a reintroduction accomplishment and as an achievement of the Endangered Species Act.

As proved by Patton, Oregon and Washington ranchers and wolves can coexist, and almost 75 percent of our state's citizens want them here. Cheers to nonlethal ranching, wolves in our northern states, and the Endangered Species Act.

Angela Crane
Vancouver

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