Personal tools
You are here: Home News Scat! Our blog Be a grizzly hero!
Document Actions
  • Email this page
  • Print this
  • Bookmark and Share

Be a grizzly hero!

Posted by Joe Scott at Jul 28, 2012 07:05 AM |

The way that North Cascades grizzly bears will recover is through natural immigration from British Columbia, lacking any movement from the US Fish and Wildlife Service on a recovery plan for threatened Cascades bears. Yet we don’t even know how many bears there are remaining on the BC side of the Cascades. So we’ve launched a new project with our BC partners asking backcountry users in BC to report potential grizzly bear sightings using a new BC grizzly bear sightings hotline, 1-855-GO-GRIZZ. Hopefully this will help fill in the BC bear blanks and raise awareness of the plight of the southern-most grizzlies on the west coast.

Be a grizzly hero!

An old bear dig makes a good cook spot for taking a break from looking for grizzlies in BC. Joe Scott (left) and John Bergenske

The only way that North Cascades grizzly bears will recover is through natural immigration from British Columbia, lacking any movement from the US Fish and Wildlife Service on a recovery plan for threatened Cascades bears. Yet we don’t even know how many bears there are remaining on the BC side of the Cascades.

So we’ve launched a new project with our BC partners asking backcountry users in BC to report potential grizzly bear sightings using a new BC grizzly bear sightings hotline, 1-855-GO-GRIZZ (1-855-464-7499).

Hopefully this will help fill in the BC bear blanks and raise awareness of the plight of the southern-most grizzlies (map) on the west coast. And also, over time, encourage citizens in Washington and BC to “invest emotionally” in this highly endangered grizzly population. It’s the only way to prevent their disappearance and further erosion of grizzly bear range in this part of the world.

Don’t forget your cameras when you go out in the woods! You could be a grizzly bear hero! Photos of grizzly bears (from a safe distance, always!) in the Cascades would be huge – but photos of bear tracks work as well.

Here's an in-a-nutshell graphic on how to tell grizzly bears from black bears.

Document Actions
powered by Plone | site by Groundwire Consulting and served with clean energy