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Conservation adventures, worldwide

Posted by Hannah Field at Aug 22, 2013 08:24 PM |

Meet Hannah, our newest wolf program intern, and the critters she's seen across the world!

Conservation adventures, worldwide

Not a typical Cascades remote camera shot! An ocelot in Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica

I’m Hannah, the newest Bellingham intern and a recent graduate in BSc (Hons) Animal Conservation Science from the University of Cumbria, England. This is my first time in the States, and I’m already appreciating the very welcoming nature of the people here. Jasmine showed me around and looked after me for my first few days. I house-sat during the first week for my host for the next few months, Mitch (looking after chickens, ducks, and cats is pretty easy!)

I have experience in a variety of conservation issues via my degree, fieldwork, and volunteer positions where I worked to educate the public on wildlife and environment. On a field studies trip to The Gambia, West Africa, I worked on a project to create a new method of monitoring vultures, which are in a critical state worldwide. We completed the first stages of creating, testing, and evaluating the new method whilst in The Gambia. I was also involved with remote camera trapping in Bijilo Forest there; setting up and monitoring the cameras with great success, including capturing video clips and photographs of civets, porcupine, and mongoose, amongst many other species. I also enjoyed bird-watching whilst there and made quite a list of sighted species.

Hannah and her dissertation poster

The next big conservation event for me was traveling to Costa Rica last summer to complete my undergraduate dissertation fieldwork. I studied hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies in the understory of Cloud Forest in Monteverde, comparing pollination activity and vegetation structure between primary forest and secondary forest. I also used remote camera trapping there, where I was lucky enough to capture an ocelot (the first recorded on the reserve) amongst other species including peccaries and white-nosed coati.  Unfortunately, I also got photos of poachers and their dogs.

I first came into contact with Jasmine via my own blog, where I posted a review of the BBC Lost Land of the Wolves documentary and other information on wolves I had learned. We then carried on connecting over e-mail and eventually Skype where I was offered the internship here. I have always wanted to work within wolf conservation and this is a fantastic opportunity for gaining experience in the various elements required to make wolf recovery a reality. The more I read, the more I begin to appreciate how much work and commitment is needed for the success of these projects. I hope to be involved with the vital outreach and education work, research projects and the fieldwork monitoring wildlife activity here.

I'm excited to get started!

 

 

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One more thing

Posted by Jasmine Minbashian at Aug 26, 2013 12:57 PM
She forgot to mention that she loves to play the banjo and brought hers with her all the way from England! Very cool. And she likes horses, so we've had no trouble getting along! :)

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