Personal tools
You are here: Home News Scat! Our blog Give our wildlife monitoring volunteers a boost
Document Actions
  • Email this page
  • Print this
  • Bookmark and Share

Give our wildlife monitoring volunteers a boost

Adopt a monitoring team to support citizen wildlife research! We're sending 27 teams out to look for wildlife in the wild landscapes of Washington. Give them a boost, and be a part of the action this season.

Give our wildlife monitoring volunteers a boost

Our wildlife monitoring volunteers helped capture this amazing image of a mama black bear and her two cubs.

Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project needs your support

Spring is here again, which means Conservation Northwest has hit the ground running on another exciting Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project season! This season marks our thirteenth year deploying remote cameras out into the wild places of Washington looking for rare and recovering species. 

Want to support one of our 27 teams this season? Adopt a monitoring team, and send these folks out into the field!

In past years, our volunteer-operated wildlife cameras have captured stunning images of everything from wolf pups in the Methow and wolverines in the Chiwaukum Mountains to martens and black bears in the Teanaway. These images not only record rare wildlife, including Washington's returning wolves, but also document connectivity for wildlife in key habitats like the I-90 corridor in the Cascades and the Columbia Highlands. 

This information is critical to the guidance of our conservation programs. To date, we've documented rare carnivores in the forests of the North Cascades, Kettle River Range, Olympics, and Selkirk Mountains, all the while coordinating with state and federal agency biologists.

"Being a part of the Cascades Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project has been an incredible experience and I'm proud to be a part of it. It is amazing what the wildlife biologists can discover through the camera photos and DNA hair snags and how it fits into the larger picture. It's also very rewarding to know that the effort to create and maintain these camera sites is important and really does make a difference." -Jim Clark, team leader

Here’s the breakdown of what our stellar volunteers will be doing this summer:

  • Eight teams are headed south to continue the search for wolves in the Southern Recovery Zone. These sites are concentrated in the Naches Ranger District and the Gifford Pinchot National Forest west of Yakima.
  • Two teams are responding to reports of wolves in the central Cascades south of Wenatchee. 
  • Five teams are spending their summer around the newly completed I-90 Gold Creek underpasses documenting all wildlife species occupying this important corridor east of Snoqualmie Pass.
  • Two teams are heading out into untamed wilderness searching for the elusive North Cascades grizzly bear.
  • Six teams are hanging bait on run-poles to track wolverine in the central Cascades around Highway 2.
  • Four teams split between the Rossland Range in British Columbia and the Kettle River Range in Northeast Washington searching for information on Canada lynx.

Every year we stock our 60+ volunteers with all the equipment and materials they need to manage their sites, and we need YOUR help to get them ready to head out in the field. This equipment ranges from bungee cords used to hold remote cameras in place to the remote cameras themselves. 

Learn more about how to become a team sponsor on our webpage. If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Alison Huyett (alison (a) conservationnw.org), our wildlife monitoring coordinator.

Document Actions
powered by Plone | site by Groundwire Consulting and served with clean energy