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Grizzly bear power of story

Posted by Joe Scott at May 29, 2013 11:25 AM |

It's a great story of the resourceful grizzly bear that ambled into the Garibaldi-Pitt area - the kind of tale that can help people understand what wildlife like grizzly bears are up against and how they often manage to figure it out. Someone, too, had a keen sense of irony naming this female grizzly bear “Power” since run-of-river power projects are one of the main threats to her habitat. But grizzly bears in southwest BC definitely need help in the form of a recovery plan that safeguards their habitat and helps prevent human conflict. Power’s story could have easily been a short one.

Grizzly bear power of story

By moving from her usual territory in the Squamish-Lillooet, the new bear became the first breeding female in the Garibaldi-Pitt of lower BC. [This is a different, nearby bear. Credit: South Coast Grizzly Bear Project]

Vancouver Sun reporter Larry Pynn tells a great story of the resourceful grizzly bear that ambled into the Garibaldi-Pitt area. It’s the kind of tale that can help people understand what wildlife like grizzly bears are up against and how they often manage to figure it out.

Someone, too, had a keen sense of irony naming this female grizzly bear “Power” since run-of-river power projects are one of the main threats to her habitat.

But grizzly bears in southwest BC definitely need help in the form of a recovery plan that safeguards their habitat and helps prevent human conflict. Power’s story could have easily been a short one.

The US federal government may finally be on track toward a recovery plan for the desperately endangered North Cascades grizzly bears whose habitat spans the Washington/British Columbia border. Recovery of four of southwest BC’s threatened grizzly bear populations is mandated by BC’s Sea to Sky Land Resource Management Plan.

It would be huge if the BC government moved ahead with recovery planning that would protect, connect, and recover the southwest BC’s fractured grizzly bear populations.   

As an international effort on behalf of this iconic critter it would likely have great benefits for the dozens of other creatures that share grizzly bear habitat, from big horn sheep to salmon. And it would be exciting and beneficial for local communities as well.

Author Doug Chadwick said it best, referring to grizzlies as umbrella species, “...guarding their critical habitat adds a layer of security for all their wild neighbors. Backpackers, mountaineers, fishermen, naturalists, tourists – all the people drawn to truly untamed settings and rich wild communities – find their values defended as well.”

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