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Moment of discovery

Posted by Jasmine Minbashian at Jul 11, 2012 12:20 PM |

Screening of the Discovery Channel film on Cascades wolves was a moment of discovery for many. Wolves are on the return to the Pacific Northwest after nearly a century's absence. As of early July, Washington State has seven confirmed packs – two more since the film, Man vs. Wolf, was made. Here's some of what I heard after the showing: "Loved it and so did my 7-year-old daughter who watched the entire show. Afterwards she declared that wolves moved from #16 to #2 on her favorite animal list (giraffes have a lock on #1). When I asked why the change of heart, she replied, 'because wolves don't scare me anymore, they're beautiful!' Sure hope she isn't the only one who got the message."

Moment of discovery

Remote cameras photo of wolves, who may be a mated pair, in Lookout Pack territory. So far there is no sign of pups. Photo: USFS

Screening of the Discovery Channel film on Cascades wolves was a moment of discovery for many new viewers. Wolves are on the return to the Pacific Northwest after nearly a century's absence. 

Did you see Man vs. Wolf? What did you think? We want to know!

Here's some of what I heard after the showing of Man vs. Wolf.

"Wolves don't scare me anymore, they're beautiful!”– 7-year-old who watched the film

"Loved it and so did my 7-year-old daughter who watched the entire show. Afterwards she declared that wolves moved from #16 to #2 on her favorite animal list (giraffes have a lock on #1). When I asked why the change of heart, she replied, 'because wolves don't scare me anymore, they're beautiful!' Sure hope she isn't the only one who got the message."

Thanks for watching! If you missed it – look for showings around the state, including Seattle, Twisp, and Yakima. Sign up at northwestwolves.org for a personal invitation!

Here's more of what people had to say about the film.

“This documentary was so well made and inspiring! Do you have any advice for Northwesterners on supporting local conservation efforts? Would love to support in any way we can!”

“Beautiful show! Long live the wolves of Washington State!”

“As a photographer myself & one who has access to captive/human raised & socialized wolves I marveled at the photography & the ability to view a icon of the wilderness so closely yet not interfering with them.”

Add yourself to an Northwest wolves email list. To help them recover, give a little – or a lot.

“I was totally inspired and moved to tears at several points. Jasmine and team – you are amazing!!!! Great work!!! Now to change humans perception and unwarranted fear of the wolf....I’m with you!”

“The film makes we want to visit the Pacific Northwest to do some serious wolfwatching ASAP!! I think if wolf supporters want to see this recovery flourish, we have to support the conservationists on the ground who are teaching us about them!”

“[Jasmine’s] willingness to accompany the hunter, to remain cool and objective, and to express the need to LISTEN as well as to preach at people with whom one strenuously disagrees is an important message. The ending poses the unanswered question – can wolves and humans coexist? Will we leave them room to be wolves and to live by their rules? Jasmine suggests that change comes through engagement with stakeholders. One of the most brilliant moments in the film took place when she asked the hunter if it is the job of humans to maintain the predator/prey balance through management or words to that effect. The man hesitated – a long pause as he thought about it – even for a brief moment. . . .”

“I find it amazing that these apex predators are making their way back, and it fills me with hope.”

As of early July, Washington State has seven confirmed packs – two more since the film, Man vs. Wolf, was made. (In April, the film aired to UK viewers as Land of the Lost Wolves.) The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife just confirmed the Huckleberry Pack near Spokane and the Colville Confederated Tribes documented the Nc’Icn Pack on their reservation lands. Wolves in both new packs are genetically related to Rocky Mountain wolves.

The Cascades have two confirmed packs: Teanaway and Lookout, all related to BC wolves. The good news is that the Teanaway Pack has had pups again this year. The bad news is that we still don’t know the breeding status of the Lookout Pack. US Forest Service biologists have gotten remote cameras photos of what may be a mated pair in Lookout Pack territory, but so far there is no sign of pups.




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