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Scat! Conservation Northwest's Blog

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Welcome to Conservation Northwest's blog.

Showing blog entries tagged as: What's Hot
Gifts that keep on giving

Gifts that keep on giving

Posted by Lindsey Moyer at Nov 18, 2011 05:25 PM |

Gift a gift that promotes conservation in the Northwest - here's a quick guide to supporting wildlife & wildlife this season, including new wolf T-shirts, and more.

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We all should suck more - biocarbon, that is!

We all should suck more - biocarbon, that is!

It's true: you suck - and I mean that in only the nicest way. There are things we all do that suck carbon out of the atmosphere - where it’s doing harm - and beneficially store it on land. We need to do much more such sucking of biocarbon to save our natural heritage from the ravages of extreme climate change. At Conservation Northwest, we help protect, connect, and restore forests and wilderness so we can suck even more carbon!

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Close encounter with a rare bear

Close encounter with a rare bear

Posted by ssmith at Jul 26, 2011 04:15 PM |

Creating history with bear bells and an iPhone: Joe Sebille recounts his historical grizzly bear sighting in the North Cascades.

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Grizzly bear thrills - and a transfusion

Grizzly bear thrills - and a transfusion

The PBS program Nature is showing three episodes this month featuring my friend Chris Morgan and the bears of Alaska. I’m thrilled for Chris and the success he’s achieved with his fresh, exciting, and unvarnished approach showcasing bears in some of the last remaining wild habitats on earth. This stuff gives me the chills; the good chills like you get when the knockout babe in history class gives you that “you may have a shot” look. I’m a “nature” show junkie and have seen hundreds of wildlife treatments. But this one is very visceral. It’s not without some sadness, however, that I watch such compelling programs. Grizzly bears have always been on the front lines in the battle against species extinctions in North America – first to go and last to return. And nowhere is that truer than in our Washington and British Columbia Cascades...

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Why wilderness, why now?

Why wilderness, why now?

Posted by Derrick Knowles at Feb 08, 2011 04:40 PM |

Big, imminent threats to wildlands like a proposed road and logging plan and mining proposals tend to really motivate the American public to voice their deep conservation values and demand protection of our special places. It can be more challenging to sound the alarm for the many wild places that may not face imminent destruction, but instead are losing their wild character and ecosystem integrity to the slow erosion and watering down of one wilderness after another.

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Cool rainforests, FTCW!

Cool rainforests, FTCW!

Posted by bchristensen at Nov 23, 2010 12:10 PM |
Filed under: What's Hot

When it comes to storing carbon, our northern rainforests are the real climate winners, according to a new book synthesizing the work of 30 international scientists.

The editor, Dr. Dominic DellaSalla, told the Washington Post this week that it was time for policymakers to put more attention to protecting old-growth and  "forgotten rainforests" like those in BC's Inland Temperate Rainforest, and the wet slopes of the Cascades and Olympics. 

The Post article point outs that,

In 2007 the 250 million acres of temperate and northern forests stored 196 gigatons of carbon - the equivalent of six times the amount of carbon dioxide humans emit each year by burning fossil fuels.

That's a pretty substantial benefit from protecting our local rainforests! The book reports that the massive trunks, dense foliage, and carbon-rich soils of these forests store more carbon than any other kind of forest, including tropical rainforests that often get the lion's share of media attention.

Joe Scott, our international conservation director says the vital BC rainforests studied do indeed "land right in the Inland Temperate Rainforest, where the groundbreaking mountain caribou recovery plan spells some relief for key parts of the forest, but there is more to do."

[Dig deeper: Get the book at Amazon]

PS. That's "For the Climate Win" :)

The long road 'round, from controversy to common ground

The long road 'round, from controversy to common ground

This spring, hundreds of people from northeastern Washington have watched a new documentary film, "From Controversy to Common Ground: The Colville National Forest Story." On April 21 in Spokane, the film showed to a crowd of local people, from business owners to timber workers. Produced by the Northeast Washington Forestry Coalition, the film tells how the Colville National Forest has come to be one of the most highly regarded national forests in the nation, as a cooperative coalition finds ways to protect roadless forests and creatively manage working forests.

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A visit to Sinlahekin and the past

A visit to Sinlahekin and the past

Posted by Mitch Friedman at Apr 26, 2010 10:20 AM |

Last week, I went on a field tour of grasslands conservation in the Similkameen River valley, which begins in southern British Columbia and flows past the border, through the Loomis Forest, and into the Okanogan River. With the honorable Chief and elders of the Lower Similkameen Indian Band from BC, I enjoyed a great day where the past and present came together with wonderful people in a beautiful place.

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Do wolverines need a passport?

Posted by bchristensen at Apr 03, 2010 09:30 PM |
Filed under: wolverine What's Hot

Three wolverines in WA were on the move this winter, and apparently, they are international travelers. A collaborative research effort that reached across the border to BC placed collars on three wolverines to better understand how these wily predators travel throughout our region. The results were surprising, and we have maps. Everyone likes maps.

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Learning more about lynx

Learning more about lynx

Posted by Joe Scott at Mar 29, 2010 10:10 AM |

For someone with a juvenile sense of humor like myself, there is always some amusement to be found in most situations. And after two days and 120 clicks on snow machines in the Loomis forest, I was starting to think the highlight would be Department of Natural Resources biologist Scott Fisher’s rear end sticking out of a chicken wire trap meant for a 20-lb lynx.

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