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Citizen wildlife monitoring report published

Feb 14, 2014
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The newest field season report by the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project underscores the value of wildlife monitoring to conserve Washington's wildlife and habitat.

Citizen wildlife monitoring report published

Intern Hannah Field places a camera in a runpole setup to seek out wolverines. Photo: Conservation NW

Every year since 2001, the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project has marshaled citizen scientists to find rare and sensitive wildlife in Washington State.

Every field season, these citizen scientists, together with Conservation Northwest and Wilderness Awareness School, produce a formal report of data garnered from remote cameras and snow tracking that paints a picture of the presence and patterns of wildlife here and in the cross-boundary region between Washington State and British Columbia.

[Watch the video!] [See the 2013 report]

Visual documentation of species helps researchers and policy makers in these budget-strapped times. Work by the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project underscores the importance of monitoring to conserve Washington's wildlife and habitat.

"It is amazing what wildlife biologists can discover through the camera photos and DNA hair snags and how it fits into the larger picture. It's also rewarding to know that the effort to create and maintain these camera sites really does make a difference." - Jim Clark (a monitoring project team leader)

2013 spring-fall report
2013 spring-fall report

The 2013 spring-fall field season report was released this month. The highlights:

  • Wolverines continued to visit the North Cascades and Central Cascades, at sites where Conservation NW cameras first documented four new wolverines last year.
  • American martens were seen at multiple sites. This smaller relative of fishers and wolverines is evidence of older forests nearby, where martens den and hunt.
  • Cascade red foxes showed their faces to several cameras; fox are one of a medley of carnivores in Washington.
  • In the important Interstate 90 corridor the highest diversity of animals - from deer and elk to black bears, coyotes, and bobcats - were documented at Price Noble and Price Creek. Price Noble is the future site of Washington's first-ever wildlife bridge, planned for construction in 2015.
  • Deer, elk, black bears, coyotes, and bobcats were documented near I-90 in habitat at Gold Creek where two freeway wildlife underpasses were completed last year.
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