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Coast to Cascades offers reward for info on Jewel's killer

Nov 03, 2013

The Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative has condemned the killing of Jewel, one of the few remaining females in the Stein-Nahatlatch grizzly bear population south of Lillooet. Two initiative member groups, Conservation Northwest and Pemberton Wildlife Association have posted a reward of $2,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible.

Coast to Cascades offers reward for info on Jewel's killer

With so few grizzly bears in southwest BC, protecting every bear, including this South Chilcotin cub, is important. Photo copyright Jeremy Williams

The Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative has condemned the killing of Jewel, one of the few remaining females in the Stein-Nahatlatch grizzly bear population south of Lillooet. Conservation Northwest and another member of the initiative, the Pemberton Wildlife Association, have posted rewards of $1,000 each for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who killed the bear.

Discovery Channel video on Jewel

This isolated group of bears, named after the iconic Stein Valley Heritage Park, now numbers fewer than 24 animals and is in serious danger of disappearing.

Jewel is the third female from the beleaguered Stein group of bears to be shot since 2006, including Jinx, her cub. Three other females have died of natural causes. 

“Losing so many females from a threatened group of bears in such a short time frame is tragic, and unless something is done to prevent further killings, this population is likely to disappear. The ban on hunting grizzlies in southwest BC is meaningless without adequate enforcement,” said Peter Wood of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. 

“The killing of Jewel is indeed tragic, but it need not be in vain if her death catalyzes actions to protect and recover these grizzly bears,” said Kyle Empringham, Coast to Cascades community engagement organizer.

“We need to reduce threats to grizzly bear habitat and better manage backcountry roads so that the bears can safely access seasonal food sources, find mates, and raise young without the threat of coming into conflict with people. These are all cost-effective, achievable solutions, but we must act soon or grizzly bears will continue to disappear from this region.”

The Coast to Cascades initiative is calling for increased Conservation Officer Service presence in the back-country, stiffer penalties for poaching and illegal grizzly killing, and the introduction of preventive measures to reduce conflict with forestry, energy, ranching, mining and recreation interests.

Have information? Please visit the RAPP reporting site or call 1-877-952-RAPP (7277)

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