Personal tools
You are here: Home News News updates Monitoring report goes live
Document Actions
  • Email this page
  • Print this
  • Bookmark and Share

Monitoring report goes live

Jun 27, 2013

During the winter field season, 72 citizen scientists with the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project captured unique images of Washington's wolverines and documented the first use by wildlife of the I-90 Gold Creek underpass.

Monitoring report goes live

The 2012-13 winter monitoring season revealed more about Cascades' wolverines and wildlife like bobcats, track shown here in the report's cover image.

During the winter field season, 72 citizen scientists with the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project captured unique images of Washington's wolverines and documented the first use by wildlife of the I-90 Gold Creek underpass. A new report contains 2012-2013 winter field season results from Washington's largest volunteer wildlife monitoring project.

A joint venture of Conservation Northwest, Wilderness Awareness School, and I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, the project involves trained volunteers to record the presence and movement of wildlife in the Washington Cascades and in northeast Washington.

Report flipbook

During this past winter, the seventh in the project's history, volunteers continued the search for rare carnivores including wolverines and wolves. More than seventy citizen scientists:

  • Captured the highest number of annual snow tracking observations to date.
  • Documented the first image of a small mammal swimming through the wildlife underpass at Gold Creek and a range of more common wildlife, including bobcats and American martens, in the I-90 wildlife corridor.
  • Documented a cougar trail associated with the remains of a deer dragged from a roadway near the Easton transect.
  • Set hair snag devices and informal tracking surveys in addition to remote cameras in the Kettle Range to gain evidence of lynx.
  • Set and maintained remote cameras which took photos revealing more about Washington's wolverines in the Highway 2 corridor of the Cascades. Today there are eleven known wolverines in Washington State.

“For wolverines to come back to these places on their own, and take up residence there again, sticking around, and calling it home,” Conservation Northwest's Jen Watkins recently told the Seattle Times, “That is thrilling.”

Document Actions
powered by Plone | site by Groundwire Consulting and served with clean energy