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Speak out for North Cascades grizzly bear restoration!

Feb 23, 2015

Comments needed to support the active recovery of an endangered Northwest native

Speak out for North Cascades grizzly bear restoration!

Grizzly Bear in NE Washington. Photo: WDFW / Dana Base

WILD NW #241: North Cascades Grizzly Bear Public Comments

Comments needed to support the active recovery of an endangered Northwest native

The National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) are conducting a public planning process (Environmental Impact Study or EIS) for restoring a healthy grizzly bear population in Washington’s North Cascades Ecosystem. 

Only a few grizzly bears remain in the transboundary North Cascades. These endangered Northwest natives need your support today if we are going to conserve and restore them for future generations!

Please visit https://parkplanning.nps.gov/commentForm.cfm?documentID=64266 to submit a comment supporting grizzly bear restoration in the North Cascades. 

The current public comment period ends on March 26th, 2015. 

Comments may also be submitted by regular mail or hand delivery at: 

Superintendent’s Office
North Cascades National Park Service Complex
810 State Route 20
Sedro Woolley, WA 98284.

Grizzly bears have been an important part of the North Cascades Ecosystem for thousands of years. They play a vital role for the health of the environment and other wildlife species, figure prominently in regional Native American and First Nations’ cultures, and contribute to the richness of our natural heritage in the Pacific Northwest. Now is the time to restore a healthy grizzly bear population in the North Cascades!

Additional talking points to include in your comments:

  • I strongly support the recovery of the North Cascades grizzly bear and commend the NPS, USFWS and WDFW for moving forward with the restoration of this important native species.
  • The recovery coordinating agencies should take into full consideration the ecological, biological, cultural, spiritual and economic importance of grizzly bears to the Pacific Northwest.
  • As the only Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone on the west coast (or outside the greater Rocky Mountains) restoring a healthy North Cascades grizzly bear population is important to the resilience of the species in general, particularly in light of climate change.
  • Quality habitat still exists for grizzly bears in the North Cascades Ecosystem. Thus, we have an ethical and legal obligation to restore a healthy grizzly bear population to the North Cascades. 
  • There is strong public support for grizzly bear recovery in the North Cascades that transcends geographic and demographic lines. Washingtonians support healthy wild ecosystems with all the native species present when habitat and ecological conditions allow. 
  • I want to see the best available science used to identify and implement active strategies to restore a viable population of grizzly bears in the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone. Therefore, the EIS must include alternatives to add a modest number of grizzly bears to the North Cascades Ecosystem under the guidance of local communities, a strategy that has been used successfully in Montana’s Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem. 

Public open houses on the Grizzly Bear Restoration EIS will also be held on:

We’ll be hosting special pre-meeting "happy hours" to help brief supporters on the facts about North Cascades grizzly bear restoration. Visit our North Cascades Grizzly Bear Facebook page to learn the locations of these happy hours and join our Facebook events for each open house. 

Want to help show your support online? Use the hashtag #SavetheCascadesGrizzly or follow and share our pages on Twitter @CascadesGrizzly or Instagram @CascadesGrizzly

Want to write a Letter to the Editor or an Opinion Editorial in your local newspaper supporting grizzly bear restoration? Contact Chase Gunnell, communications manager, at communications@conservationnw.org

Why do we Need Grizzly Bears in the North Cascades? 

  • Grizzly bears are culturally and spiritually significant to First Nations throughout the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia. Grizzlies are seen as teachers, guides and symbols of strength and wisdom to indigenous peoples. They are a regional icon and a key part of our natural heritage.
  • Grizzly bears are considered an “umbrella” species, and they play an important role for healthy ecosystems. Habitat that supports grizzly bears also supports hundreds of other plants and animals and human needs like clean water, healthy forests and quality outdoor opportunities. 
  • Grizzly bears have been part of the Pacific Northwest landscape for thousands of years. We have an ethical and legal obligation to restore this native species. Grizzly bear recovery in the North Cascades is an important part of national efforts to restore endangered animals where suitable habitat still exists.
    NCE Grizzly. Photo: BC Ministry of Environment
    NCE Grizzly. Photo: BC Ministry of Environment

More on North Cascades Grizzly Bear Restoration

  • With nearly 10,000 square miles stretching from I-90 north to the Canadian border and anchored by North Cascades National Park, the designated North Cascades Grizzly Bear Recovery Area is one of largest blocks of wild federal land remaining in the lower 48 states. But it is isolated from viable grizzly bear populations in other parts of the U.S. and Canada.
  • Research indicates this wilderness landscape has quality habitat capable of supporting a self-sustaining grizzly bear population. A few grizzly bears have recently been sighted in the Canadian part of the ecosystem, but no grizzly bears have been sighted in the United States portion for several years.
  • Given the low number of existing grizzly bears, their very slow reproductive rate and other constraints, the North Cascades grizzly bear population is considered the most at-risk grizzly bear population in the United States today. With so few grizzly bears left in the North Cascades, biologists believe they may soon disappear entirely from the area if recovery actions aren't taken.  

Want even more information? Visit our webpage www.conservationnw.org/northcascadesgrizzly for our full backgrounder on North Cascades grizzly bear recovery, suggested public talking points, links to more information and a Frequently Asked Questions list from the government agencies leading the recovery process. Thank you for your support of this historic recovery process!

 
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