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New wolf pack confirmed in the Washington Cascades

Jul 05, 2011

July 5 - Today, the Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed the second known pack of wolves in the Cascade Mountains in decades. The “Teanaway Pack” was first discovered by volunteers working for Conservation Northwest’s wildlife monitoring program.

New wolf pack confirmed in the Washington Cascades

A wolf recorded by our Conservation Northwest remote cameras in the Teanaway. This photo launched a state and federal investigation which this week confirmed the presence of the second known pack in the Cascades in decades.

Today, the Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed the second known pack of wolves in the Cascade Mountains in decades. The “Teanaway Pack” was first discovered by volunteers working for Conservation Northwest’s wildlife monitoring program. Press release

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After sharing our remote camera images from the Teanaway with state and federal agencies, biologists began further investigation and confirmed today through DNA analysis that these canids are in fact wild wolves.

Further images caught on remote cameras show multiple animals in one shot, confirming the presence of a pack, as opposed to one dispersing individual.  Earlier this month, WDFW trapped and collared a lactating female wolf, a sign that the pack may be producing pups.

“Conservation Northwest is proud to be a part of the effort to document the return of the wolf to the Cascade Mountains,” said Jasmine Minbashian, special projects director for Conservation Northwest. 

“Wolves bring life back into the Cascades. They can help restore balance to ecosystems through their role as top dog of the wilderness.”  

This announcement of a new wolf pack in the Cascades comes on the heels of reports that only two animals remain in the original Lookout Pack. Authorities believe their numbers were severely reduced by illegal killing, and federal indictments have been leveled against members of a Methow Valley family. To address this challenge to wolf recovery in Washington, Conservation Northwest recently partnered with WDFW to establish a state reward fund to apprehend poachers.

In the meantime, the state has convened a diverse group of stakeholders, including Conservation Northwest, to develop a state recovery and management plan for wolves. “We’re working to make sure that as wolves return to Washington they are managed in a way that minimizes hardship on local ranchers and hunters, while still allowing them to recover,” Minbashian said.

What you can do for Washington's wolves:
  • Sign up for email alerts for the latest updates on wolf recovery and opportunities to help secure a wild future for wolves. 
  • Donate to support our efforts to help wolves recover in Washington and to stop the illegal killing of these and other endangred wildlife, like the North Cascades grizzly.

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