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Wild Links for Cascadia wildlife

Oct 21, 2013

In a climate changed world, the North Cascades will serve as refuge for wildlife on the move on both sides of the U.S./Canadian border. To help, Conservation Northwest hosted the Wild Links conference October 16-17, 2013, at Manning Park BC.

Wild Links for Cascadia wildlife

The Cascadia Parnter Forum got its start at 2012 Wild Links conference at the North Cascades Institute. Photo: Erin Moore

In a climate changed world, the North Cascades will be refuge for wildlife moving in search of more suitable habitats necessary for their continued survival.

On both sides of the U.S./Canadian border, the task is to connect habitat, tackle the obstacles to wildlife movement, and help provide safe passage for wildlife on the move.

To help, Conservation Northwest hosted the Wild Links conference October 16-17, 2013, at Manning Park BC.

More about Wild Links

Now in its seventh year, the Wild Links conference is a forum for scientists and practitioners to make sure decisions on the ground affecting wildlife and lands management are informed by the best information, and that the information the scientific community is collecting and analyzing proves most useful for a future for wildlife.

In a climate changed world, the North Cascades will be refuge for wildlife on the move.

This year’s Wild Links focused on the new Cascadia Partner Forum, a network of natural resource practitioners building the adaptive capacity of our region for wildlife in the face of climate change.

This wildlife conference is one of the few opportunities government agencies, nonprofits, and other practitioners have to collaborate on priorities, so vital for wildlife to thrive in the years to come.

Participants – from biologists to climate scientists to conservationists – considered issues related to climate adaptation, habitat recovery, data collection, and information sharing. As one participant noted, these issues “can’t be addressed in isolation. It requires a landscape scale approach and wide partnerships.”

The conference itself was described as “a stew, everybody throws in ingredients.” Another noted that we are now “moving into a new conservation paradigm, from looking at species in isolation to ecosystems and structure and landscapes.” A tall order, but vital to protecting a wild Northwest in the age of climate change.

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