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Wolf funding eases conflict

May 02, 2013

The state has passed legislation funding proven methods including range riding to reduce conflicts with large carnivores. Funds will come from $10 added to the cost of a Washington vanity license plate. The change is expected to raise more than $1 million/year without raising taxes.

Wolf funding eases conflict

Fladry is a type of flagged fencing that works to deter wolves and other predators. Turbo fladry, shown here, is electrified, to boot. Conservation Northwest's Kit McGurn in the field. Photo Jay Kehne

In April, legislation passed creating a secure source of funds for non-lethal tools and efforts like range riders, livestock carcass removal, turbo fladry, and other deterrents to help prevent and reduce conflicts between wolves and livestock.

Funds will come from $10 added to the cost of a Washington vanity license plate. The money raised goes to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for its wolf work. The change is expected to raise more than $1 million a year without raising taxes to fund proven methods to reduce conflicts with large carnivores.

"This is great news for Washington’s wolves and ranchers in wolf country who want to use proven methods to reduce conflicts with large carnivores," Derrick Knowles, Conservation Northwest conservation associate

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission also passed a resolution authorizing a temporary rule permitting ranchers, farmers, and pet and livestock owners in federally delisted portions of the state (east of the Okanogan River) to kill a wolf in the act of attacking their animals. The emergency rule expands existing authority in the state wolf plan to allow such actions without a permit and to protect pets as well as livestock.

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