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August 2011

Conservation Connection August 2011

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In this issue:

  • Take Action to protect forests
  • Take Action for wolves
  • Remote wildlife cameras


Join others in Spokane and Republic to write a personal letter for Colville wilderness. Photo: Craig Romano

Join others in Spokane and Republic to write a personal letter for Colville wilderness.
Photo: Craig Romano










Strengthen Forest Plans for the Okanogan-Wenatchee and Colville

Evolving this year are plans for the next 20 years for old growth, wilderness, and recreation on the Okanogan-Wenatchee and Colville National Forests. The Forest Service heard from many of you at public meetings held around the state–thank you! Now take action to urge the Forest Service to protect old-growth forests, secure wildlife habitat, preserve clean water, recommend wilderness and roadless areas for protection, and adopt strategies to help forests and wildlife adapt to climate change.

What you can do. Write a letter for both the Okanogan-Wenatchee and the Colville National Forests; then write again for wilderness on the Colville National Forest. You can help protect Mount Leona from possible uranium mining in the Columbia Highlands .

Want to do more? Volunteer as crew to help construct the new Gibraltar Trail near Republic, WA, on Sept 10-11 –bring your friends! This exciting new mountain biking and hiking trail winds nearly 20 miles amid old-growth ponderosa grasslands and rocky knobs with views out to the Kettle Crest.




It's high time for a sensible, science-based wolf recovery plan for Washington's returning wolves, like the Teanaway wolf shown here. Photo: Western Transportation Institute

It's high time for a sensible, science-based wolf recovery plan for Washington's returning wolves, like the Teanaway wolf shown here.
Photo: Western Transportation Institute





Doing It Right for Wolves

Wolves are on their way back, and Washington State is doing it right , creating a management and conservation plan that will help wolves recover and people adapt. Poaching, loss of endangered species status, and other threats loom large. Without a strong recovery plan, Washington's wolves remain at risk.

The most important thing you can do for wolves is voice your support for a science-based plan, in person, at public hearings on Nov 3rd in Olympia. Outreach Coordinator Kit McGurn can help you craft an effective message and get you to Olympia. Your two to three minutes of testimony today helps create a long-term future for Washington's wolves!

 

 

An elk peeks curiously at a tree-mounted, motion-triggered camera. Wildlife monitoring volunteers combine year-long remote camera work with wintertime snow tracking. Photo: Conservation NW remote camera

An elk peeks curiously at a tree-mounted, motion-triggered camera. Wildlife monitoring volunteers combine year-long remote camera work with wintertime snow tracking.
Photo: Conservation NW remote camera

 

 

 

 


Observing Seldom Seen Wildlife

Thanks to volunteers, members, and supporters like you, Conservation Northwest's wildlife monitoring programs continue to capture exclusive photographs of seldom-seen animals in the wild. Our remote cameras are responsible for the discovery of Washington's first wolf packs, along with numerous other wild animals including cougars, lynx, wolverines, pine martens, and more.

Citizen wildlife monitoring volunteers venture deep into the backcountry to set up, operate, and maintain our cameras. Their work is invaluable to our organization, and their experiences in the field keep them coming back for more. Read about one volunteer's encounter with a very blonde, black bear - and why she will never forget a photograph of a cougar captured by one of our cameras.


 

 

 

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