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August 2012

Conservation Connection August 2012

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In this issue:

  • Wedge Pack wolves
  • RSVP for Lake Whatcom
  • Paul Bannick awarded
  • Restoring a habitat


What's next for Wedge Pack wolves. [VIDEO] Photo: WDFW

What's next for Wedge Pack wolves.
Photo: WDFW










Wedge Pack Wolves Under the Gun

Washington State is facing its first major test when it comes to wolf management, as the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) recently authorized killing up to four members of the Wedge Pack, claiming that the pack has repeatedly preyed on livestock. Washington's Wolf Conservation and Management Plan allows for the lethal removal of members of a pack when depredations are clearly linked to wolves, depredations are likely to continue, and non-lethal methods have been exhausted. In this case, however, independent experts with decades of experience in identifying wolf attacks on livestock called much of the evidence against the Wedge Pack wolves inconclusive. We urged the Governor (thank you for your phone calls!) to ask WDFW to take a more measured approach, as laid out in Washington's Wolf Conservation and Management Plan.

We have since learned that WDFW has hit the pause button. Our wolf program director, Jasmine Minbashian, met with agency staff yesterday and learned that the department has removed wolf traps and its sharpshooter from the woods and is reassessing the situation. They will make a decision by next Tuesday on what steps to take next. In the meantime, please know that your calls of concern are being heard and that Conservation Northwest is working on long-term solutions to avoid situations like this one in the future.






Stately Douglas fir on Stewart Mountain in the proposed forest preserve. Photo: Erin Moore

Stately Douglas fir on Stewart Mountain in the proposed forest preserve.
Photo: Erin Moore





RSVP for Lake Whatcom

In May, a new wildlife park and forestland reconveyance won approval by the Whatcom County Council. Now, opponents are trying to roll back this victory for low-impact recreation, local control of natural resources, and old-growth forest for future generations.

If you live in Whatcom County, please attend a public hearing, Tuesday, September 11, at 7 pm, in Bellingham. Your presence helps determine the future for the Lake Whatcom Forest Preserve Park in an important municipal watershed.






 

 

Paul Bannick's day job is development director with Conservation Northwest.

Paul Bannick's day job is development director with Conservation Northwest.

 


Prestigious Photography Award Comes to Paul Bannick

Conservation photographer Paul Bannick's image of a snowy owl in flight was recently chosen as the photo that "best exemplifies" the mission of the International Conservation Photography Awards: "advancing photography as a unique medium capable of bringing awareness and preservation to the environment through art."

The Burke Museum in Seattle is exhibiting 75 worldwide, award-winning photos, through November 25. The biennial, juried competition was founded by acclaimed local nature photographer, Art Wolfe.



 

 

Make your way to Gold Creek to restore native plants for wildlife. Photo: Aaron Theisen

Make your way to Gold Creek to restore native plants for wildlife.
Photo: Aaron Theisen

 

 

 

 


Restoring a Habitat "Hallway" near I-90

On September 29 and October 13, Conservation Northwest is planting more than 5,000 native plants and seeds around Gold Creek pond. Our work restores wildlife habitat where two underpasses beneath I-90 are nearing completion for wildlife.

For that, we need you! Conservation Northwest provides the tools, gloves, beverages, and snacks. Help furnish this habitat "hallway" near Snoqualmie Pass in the Cascades, so that animals from elk to wolverines can successfully cross beneath the busy interstate. What better way to entice wildlife into using the underpasses but by restoring native plants!




 

 

 

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