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December 2012

Conservation Connection December 2012

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In this issue:

  • Old growth for the future
  • On the frontlines
  • Roadless in the Highlands
  • A year of solutions


All we want for Christmas is old growth for wildlife. Saw-whet owl in large old snag. Photo: Todd Entrikin

All we want for Christmas is old growth for wildlife. Saw-whet owl in large old snag.
Photo: Todd Entrikin










Old Growth for the Future

Old growth forests are declining worldwide. That's the bad news. A study by Jerry Franklin and colleagues warns of rapid worldwide declines of old trees. "Large old trees...provide nesting or sheltering cavities for up to 30% of all birds and animals in some ecosystems. They store huge amounts of carbon."

And the good news? We protect old growth and restore younger forests so that they can mature into old growth. This year alone, we advanced tens of thousands of acres of forest restoration on the Okanogan-Wenatchee and Colville National Forests. Please donate today for the forests and wildlife of tomorrow.






Is this Cascades wolverine celebrating Washington's returning wildlife? Are you?

Is this Cascades wolverine celebrating Washington's returning wildlife? Are you?





On the Frontlines for Wildlife

Our wildlife monitoring project volunteers are on the frontlines, tracking wildlife where agencies don't have the resources to go, from the Cascades to the Kettle Crest. 2012 was one of our best seasons yet. Like our citizen science? Adopt a camera team.

This year we documented the first animal, a coyote, to use an important new I-90 crossing that you helped realize. Our monitors also discovered a wolverine south of Stevens Pass, the first in decades.






 

 

Hikers enjoy the roadless Kettle Crest in Washington. Photo: Tim Coleman

Hikers enjoy the roadless Kettle Crest in Washington.
Photo: Tim Coleman

 


Roadless in the Highlands

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal challenging the Clinton-era Roadless Rule, solidifying protection of 50 million acres of national forest roadless lands, including the 2 million acres in Washington.

For the Columbia Highlands, where with our partners we persevere to protect wilderness in the Kettle Range and Selkirk Mountains, the ruling sends a message to any who doubted that the American public wants to see these special places protected.



 

 

Washington moves forward for wolves. Photo: National Park Service

Washington moves forward for wolves.
Photo: National Park Service

 

 

 

 


A Year of Finding Solutions

In 2012, we celebrated and worked through gains and losses for Washington's wolves. BBC and Discovery told their—and our—story in a stunning documentary seen by millions. And we looked for positive outcomes in the tragedy of a pack in conflict.

Through it all, we focused on finding long-lasting solutions for wolves and people, from funding a poaching reward fund and a successful range rider pilot project, to building positive relationships in support of non-lethal wolf control. To improve the outlook for wolves and ranches, we brought experts and states agencies together, listened to livestock owners, and learned from the places where it is working. As wolves track through the Wedge again, we are confident Washington is poised to do a better job this time.




 

 

 

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