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February 2011

Conservation Connection February 2011

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In this issue:

  • WA wolves & cougars
  • Wildlife & recreation
  • Spring & summer celebrations
  • Connecting wildlife


Washington's cougars need sound science, not scare tactics.

Washington's cougars need sound science, not scare tactics.
Photo: © Art Wolfe






For Washington's Wolves–and Cougars–Times Still Tough

Wolves - You recently helped us stall two bills harmful to Washington's wolves, thank you! Unfortunately, a third bill has reared its head again, with a last-minute hearing scheduled for March 4 in Olympia. Please join us at this important hearing; it's the last chance this year to voice support for Washington's wolves. HB 1109 allows political interference with a collaborative, science-based recovery plan and wastes taxpayers' money. In the face of anti-wolf sentiment and increasing poaching, we need your help again for Washington's wolves on the fragile edge of recovery.

Cougar - Washington's mountain lions this session share the legislative limelight. In 1996, 63% of Washington voters chose to ban most hunting with hounds in our state. And a 2008 poll by WDFW found 92% of citizens agree that, "Cougars are an important and essential component of Washington ecosystems." Yet lawmakers seek to open up sport hound hunting of cougars across the state. We support cougar management informed by best science, one that ensures healthy populations of cougars serving their ecological role in Washington's natural areas. This bill isn't that. Add your voice: take action today.




Playing outside, something we all love to do.

Playing outside, something we all love to do.
Photo: Crystal Gartner





Recreation and Wildlife Need Your Support

Local - Where do you like to play outside in Washington? Chances are good a program called the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program helped preserve or improve your favorite place to hike, ski, bike, or ride, as well as local working farms and forests. Please help ensure WWRP keeps helping our state well into the future by taking easy action online.

National - A continuing resolution to fund the US government contains huge cuts across the board, including dire funding needed for wildlife and habitat, such as funds to protect working ranchlands in the Columbia Highlands. Please urge your Senators to support funding for state and tribal wildlife grants, North American wetland and endangered species funds, and many other conservation programs.




 

 

The Owl and the Woodpecker, a fascinating exhibit in Seattle by wildlife photojournalist Paul Bannick.

The Owl and the Woodpecker, a fascinating exhibit in Seattle by wildlife photojournalist Paul Bannick.
Photo: © Paul Bannick

 


Spring and Summer Celebrations

March birds - Award-winning book The Owl and the Woodpecker goes big time in an exhibit opening March 19 at Seattle's Burke Museum. Featured are the amazing images of naturalist-photographer and Conservation Northwest's development director Paul Bannick. North America's owls and woodpeckers enrich the very habitats on which they depend. They are worth fighting for. Ask us how you can receive a coupon for $2-off museum admission.

June hope - Please remember to save the date, June 8, for our lively annual auction at Herban Feast's historic SoDo Park. We guarantee a special and exciting night celebrating our work at this year's Hope for a Wild Future!

 

 

A vision of 
          I-90 wildlife by Naomi Klimek, a finalist in the 2010 Bridging Futures 
          contest.

A vision of I-90 wildlife by Naomi Klimek, a finalist in the 2010 Bridging Futures contest.

 

 

 

 


Connecting Wildlife, from US to Canada

US - The 6th annual Bridging Futures contest is now open to all young Washington artists between the ages of 5 and 11! This fun and educational contest taps into the creativity of kids statewide to highlight a unique solution for driver and wildlife safely along I-90: wildlife bridges.

Canada - In British Columbia's Purcell Mountains, just over Washington's border, locals are helping protect grizzly bears from a jumbo-sized development. Members of the Ktunaxa Nation recently affirmed their commitment to protect grizzly bears and the Quat'muk, which includes Jumbo Valley, for today and tomorrow's generations. Will you stand up with them for bears?


 

 

 

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