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February 2013

Conservation Connection February 2013

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In this issue:

  • Lake Whatcom preserve
  • Return of the wolverines
  • Protecting caribou
  • Wolf recovery


A new preserve for Lake Whatcom will be a boost to our local economy. Photo: Erin Moore

A new preserve for Lake Whatcom will be a boost to our local economy.
Photo: Erin Moore










Lake Whatcom Preserve Grows Up

On March 12, the Whatcom County Council votes at last whether to protect one-quarter of a valuable watershed as the Lake Whatcom Forest Preserve Park. More than a hundred local businesses have urged the Council to approve an exchange that benefits all residents with new trails, reduced risk of dangerous landslides, and wildlife habitat. Lend your voice! Let Lake Whatcom forests grow to their full potential and beauty: You can take action online or attend the hearing.






Seattle Times front-page cameo for our remote camera program and Gulo gulo. Photo: Conservation Northwest

Seattle Times front-page cameo for our remote camera program and Gulo gulo.
Photo: Conservation Northwest





Celebrating the Return of Cascades Wolverines

Thirteen years since groups including Conservation Northwest called for protection, wolverines may receive Endangered Species Act listing in the lower 48. The proposed ESA protections will help recover wolverines and bring new resources to protect wild places. Wolverines were also the star of a Seattle Times feature and our wildlife monitoring efforts. Look for an alert in the coming weeks.






 

 

Selkirks mountain caribou, ice age survivors, at risk of blinking out? Photo: Joe Scott

Selkirks mountain caribou, ice age survivors, at risk of blinking out?
Photo: Joe Scott

 


Protecting America's Last Mountain Caribou

Mountain caribou are one of the most endangered large mammals in North America, precariously close to extinction in their globally unique habitat. Despite this, the snowmobile industry is pushing for their delisting and removal of critical habitat protections. Please speak up for endangered caribou and the contiguous tracts of high elevation old-growth forest habitat they need.



 

 

Encore! Last season's successful range rider pilot project reduced wolf-livestock conflict. Photo: Inland NW Land Trust

Encore! Last season's successful range rider pilot project reduced wolf-livestock conflict.
Photo: Inland NW Land Trust

 

 

 

 


Targeted Solutions to Recover Wolves

Legislators in Washington State are reviewing bills important to wolf recovery and conservation. Your calls helped foil some of the proposed legislation harmful to wolves, but Washington's wolves still need you. Urge your elected representatives to support bills that fund non-lethal conflict solutions, bolster our state's balanced and science-based wolf recovery plan, and help wolves recover.




 

 

 

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