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January 2011

Conservation Connection January 2011

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In this issue:

  • Support WA wolves
  • 3 minutes for wildlife
  • I-90 wildlife bridge
  • Giving opportunities


Washington's wolves are under fire: a pup from the Methow pack.

Washington's wolves are under fire: a pup from the Methow pack.






Support Washington's Endangered Wolves

Many state politicians are hard at work solving our state's economic crisis, but some instead are hard at work stripping protections for endangered wolves in Washington. Three harmful, anti-wolf bills have been introduced into the state legislature this session, backdoor attempts to harm Washington's wolves and ongoing wolf recovery efforts.

Sponsoring legislators hope to quickly move these proposed laws through to a vote before the public has had a chance to weigh in. Please use the online action system today to speak out against these radical bills. Let our lawmakers know you support recovery of Washington's wolves!



For a quick taste of heaven, watch a 3-minute version of our Columbia 
          Highlands wilderness Google Earth tour.

For a quick taste of heaven, watch a 3-minute version of our Columbia Highlands Google Earth tour.





Momentous Minutes for Columbia Highlands Wildlife

Got three minutes for wild places and wildlife? Watch a hot new, abbreviated version of our Google Earth flyover of northeastern Washington’s Columbia Highlands. Have another ten minutes? Compose a quick letter to Senator Maria Cantwell and Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers reminding them of an exceptional chance to create a balanced future for local communities and wildlife and to protect wilderness in the Columbia Highlands.

Or, take a moment to call the Spokane offices of Sen. Cantwell, (509) 353-2507, and Rep. McMorris Rodgers: (509) 353-2374. Make your call concise and upbeat. Urge her to introduce a wilderness bill for the Columbia Highlands this spring, and thank her and her staff for being involved and for supporting this collaborative effort. Your one call can have momentous effect for northeastern Washington.




 

 

Washington is very close to achieving its first-ever wildlife bridge, 
          shown here in an artist's rendition.

Washington is very close to achieving its first-ever wildlife bridge, shown here in an artist's rendition.
Photo: WA DOT

 


What's Next? I-90's First-Ever Wildlife Bridge

Interstate 90, the largest east-west freight highway in Washington, is heavily used by many drivers. That use is often at odds with wildlife, particularly near Snoqualmie Pass, where I-90 severs the path that animals need to travel north to south through the Cascades. Yet there's a solution to helping wildlife cross safely.

The WA Department of Transportation is expected to save $110 million from the completed first phase of ongoing construction on the I-90 Project. Approximately half of that savings could easily be invested back into preventing collisions and connecting roaming wildlife by constructing a ready-to-go, second phase, including a wildlife bridge at the Rock Knob. Please send a letter today urging state legislators to direct the savings back into Phase 2 of the I-90 Project.

 

 

Auctioneer John 
          Curley and a volunteer in action at "Hope for a Wild Future." 
          To all of you who've donated to help keep the Northwest wild, thank 
          you!

Auctioneer John Curley and a volunteer in action at "Hope for a Wild Future." To all of you who've donated to help keep the Northwest wild, thank you!

 

 

 

 


Summer Longings: Giving Opportunities

Don't miss this tax-free giving opportunity for Conservation Northwest: If you are age 70 or older, you'll want to take advantage of a special giving opportunity to support our work to protect your beloved wild places. Congress has reauthorized a provision that allows tax-free charitable gifts from IRA accounts to qualified charities. Until Jan. 31, you can make a tax-free gift that will count retroactively for 2010. Click here for details.

Also, please save a date in late May for this year's "Hope for a Wild Future" auction with Conservation Northwest. Attendees to this lively evening raise thousands of dollars for wildlife and wildlands. Our auctioneer this year is the highly entertaining John Curley and the venue is Herban Feast in Seattle’s SoDo Park.


 

 

 

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