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July 2012

Conservation Connection July 2012

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In this issue:

  • Washington's wolves
  • Bear eyes
  • Wildlife monitoring
  • Protecting Qat'muk


Huckleberry Pack pups, just north of the Spokane Reservation. Photo: WDFW

Huckleberry Pack pups, just north of the Spokane Reservation.
Photo: WDFW










Long Journey Home for Washington's Wolves

Appearance of Washington's pioneer pack, the Lookout Pack, was celebrated almost exactly four years ago. Then, not long after their discovery, poachers killed most members of the pack. Though the case against those responsible is finally over and justice served, repercussions for the Lookout Pack are ongoing.

Today, of eight confirmed wolf packs in our state, six are on in eastern Washington and just two are in the Cascades. The Cascades' Teanaway Pack likely bore pups again this year–that's good news. But as far as we know, the Lookout Pack has yet to produce more young. Please stay involved as we recover wolves in Washington by helping stop poaching, working with ranchers, and documenting the newest packs.






A new poster featured at trailheads and retail outlets highlights a BC grizzly bear sightings hotline and a map of the target area. Look for it!

A new poster featured at trailheads and retail outlets highlights a BC grizzly bear sightings hotline and a map of the target area. Look for it!





Get Your BC Grizzly Bear Eyes On

With a new sightings hotline, Conservation Northwest and BC conservation groups including Hope Mountain Centre are gaining more eyes in the field to document grizzly bears, which are rare not only in our US Cascades but in southern BC, too.

You can help by calling in your sightings to the new BC grizzly bear hotline, 1-855-GO-GRIZZ. Reports will be screened by trained volunteers and forwarded to government biologists for follow up with field verification. Hiking or fishing in southern BC this summer? Let us know what you see! Your documented sightings protect bears.






 

 

Volunteer adds scent to a remote camera station and tracks wildlife in winter. Photo: David Moskowitz

Volunteer adds scent to a remote camera station and tracks wildlife in winter.
Photo: David Moskowitz

 


A Winter's Tale for Wildlife Monitoring

The Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project's most recent winter field report is posted! Partner organizations are Conservation Northwest, I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, and Wilderness Awareness School.

This year, volunteers working transects along I-90 turned up the usual suspects: deer, bobcat, and elk; but also, for the first time, a coyote using the partly completed new underpass crossing below I-90 at Gold Creek. Also exciting was the discovery of Washington's newest wolverine, named Peg–the first wolverine recorded south of Highway 2 in decades and an individual previously unknown from other professional research projects in the Cascades. Wow.



 

 

Help people in northeastern Washington after the storms have passed. Thirteenmile view. Photo: Derrick Knowles

Help people in northeastern Washington after the storms have passed.
Photo: Derrick Knowles

 

 

 

 


Meeting Ferry County Disaster with Donations, Volunteers

Here's an opportunity to help people living in Ferry County in the Columbia Highlands. Hundreds of families are still without power after severe storms hit the Inland Northwest last week. Those living in Ferry County and in the town of Keller on the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation were hit particularly hard. We're asking people to help.

The Forest Service is still assessing damage done by the storms to trails and recreation sites in the Colville National Forest. That makes volunteer trail work even more important. Grab a shovel and make a commitment. If you can contribute your time and brawn, please contact Derrick Knowles.




 

 

 

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