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June 2012

Conservation Connection June 2012

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In this issue:

  • NW wolves on TV
  • Whatcom wildland park
  • I-90 wildlife crossings
  • "Peg," the wolverine


On Sat, July 7, Washington's wolves get (even more) famous. Photos: BBC/Discovery Channel

On Sat, July 7, Washington's wolves get (even more) famous.
Photos: BBC/Discovery Channel










Northwest Wolves Go National July 7th

You had a brief preview at our May auction; now everyone can enjoy the story of Washington's wolves in a Discovery Channel premiere on July 7th. The new documentary film follows Conservation Northwest's Jasmine Minbashian and the rest of the expedition team as they trek the Cascades to discover the fate of the Lookout Pack, Washington's pioneer pack of wolves.






Two forested parcels (circled) at Lake Whatcom, drinking water source for 100,000 people. Photo: Tore Ofteness

Two forested parcels (circled) at Lake Whatcom, drinking water source for 100,000 people.
Photo: Tore Ofteness





Closer to a Whatcom Wildland Park

We are closer! The path to protecting one quarter of the Lake Whatcom watershed has shifted now from a May approval by the Whatcom County Council to a July 3rd vote by the state's Board of Natural Resources. Please take action today urging the state to support a new Lake Whatcom Forest Preserve Park, protecting wildlife, clean water, and recreation in a new wildland park.






 

 

June tragedy for a black bear crossing I-90. Photo: Wash. State Patrol

June tragedy for a black bear crossing I-90.
Photo: Wash. State Patrol

 


Wildlife Crossings for I-90 Gain Speed

Safer passage is nearer for wildlife negotiating Interstate 90 in Washington's Cascades. This year's final transportation bill includes design funds for Washington's first-ever wildlife bridge. Construction of the Rock Knob wildlife overpass breaks ground in 2015, providing a way across for animals from wolverine to elk traveling north and south in core connecting habitat in the Cascades.



 

 

A summertime of new wildlife sightings. Photo: Conservation Northwest

A summertime of new wildlife sightings.
Photo: Conservation Northwest

 

 

 

 


A Cascades Wolverine Named "Peg"

Since 2000, Conservation Northwest has captured the enthusiasm of volunteers for wildlife monitoring and shared the data gained with biologists. Now, a wolverine we recently documented turns out to be new to the Cascades, and we have named her Peg! After being the first to document the Lookout and Teanaway wolf packs with our wildlife monitoring program cameras, who knew that we'd go on to identify a unique individual wolverine - and name her no less!




 

 

 

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