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November 2012

Conservation Connection November 2012

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In this issue:

  • Gift ideas
  • Land of the Lost Wolves
  • Lark and butterfly
  • Investing in wildlife


Claire and Marcus are a powerful wolverine monitoring team. Sponsor them this winter! It's one of the many ways you can keep the Northwest wild. Photo: Erin Moore

Claire and Marcus are a powerful wolverine monitoring team. Sponsor them this winter! It's one of the many ways you can keep the Northwest wild.
Photo: Erin Moore










Wolves and Eagles and Bears—Oh, Yes

As we give thanks and move into the busy giving season, let us tempt you with fun gift ideas. Wolf jigsaw puzzles, handy water bottles, and wildlife T-shirts all wrap up nicely. Going for experience rather than things? You can sponsor a wildlife monitoring team in the snowy Cascades to record the presence of rare wildlife.

Need outdoor gear to visit the lands and wildlife we're working together to protect? Shop online at REI and Conservation Northwest gets 5% of your purchase back. You can also double your impact through workplace matching or sign up as a Wildland Partner to spread your gift out over the months. Need other ideas? Contact Membership Associate Julia Spencer, 800.878.9950 x 10. Thanks for all you're doing to create hope for a wild future.






A new film documentary about Cascades wolves drew a lively, interested crowd to Kane Hall. Photo: Conservation Northwest

A new film documentary about Cascades wolves drew a lively, interested crowd to Kane Hall.
Photo: Conservation Northwest





Connecting Wolves to People

In the last few weeks, hundreds more people in Seattle and Twisp have experienced the BBC/Discovery Channel's 2012 Cascades wolf documentary. The events featured extensive film clips followed by a panel of experts, including Jasmine Minbashian, film expedition leader, Jay Kehne of Conservation Northwest, and wildlife biologists, answering questions about wolf recovery.

"Land of the Lost Wolves" highlights one of the great comeback kids of our state, Washington's wolves. You, too, can attend upcoming special screenings in Yakima, December 4 and Bellevue, January 26. See you there! Learn more about how we are finding solutions for people and wolves.






 

 

The streaked horned lark depends on prairies and prairie vegetation for nesting and overwintering. Photo: USFWS

The streaked horned lark depends on prairies and prairie vegetation for nesting and overwintering.
Photo: USFWS

 


A Tale of Lark and Butterfly

Two rare prairie wildlife, streaked horned lark and Taylor's checkerspot butterfly, may gain protection soon, thanks to your help urging the US Fish and Wildlife Service to list them as endangered and safeguard the habitat critical to their survival. Their native prairie habitat is our state's fastest disappearing ecosystem - today, just 3% remains.

One of those habitats, site of the proposed Cross-Base Highway, is perhaps the last, best remaining oak-woodland prairie in western Washington. For more than a decade, you, Conservation Northwest, and Tahoma Audubon have helped protect this South Sound prairie. Your part is needed again - please take action by December 10.



 

 

The Gotham Ranch, a vital piece of the Cascades to Rockies wildlife corridor. Photo: Paul Bannick

The Gotham Ranch, a vital piece of the Cascades to Rockies wildlife corridor.
Photo: Paul Bannick

 

 

 

 


Investing in Wildlife Keeps Cascades Connected to the Rockies

America is fast losing its working farms and ranches to global price competition and real estate development. Keeping the ranches that are the most valuable to wildlife in open space is important for wildlife from lynx and wolves to deer and elk. Safeguarding ranchlands also helps sustain the local agriculture economy and rural western heritage.

In the Columbia Highlands, Conservation Northwest is raising private capital and leveraging public funds to keep several ranches from falling to mining or development, including the Dawson and Gotham properties. Your donation today will be matched, helping keep a network of habitat connected between the Cascades and Rocky Mountains. Thank you!




 

 

 

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