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October 2012

Conservation Connection October 2012

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In this issue:

  • Living with wolves
  • Double your impact
  • Power past coal
  • Lace up your boots


Range riding as a non-lethal way to reduce wolf-livestock conflicts has met with success in the West. Conservation Northwest is supporting this tool and others in Washington. Photo: Lisa Whiteman/NRDC

Range riding as a non-lethal way to reduce wolf-livestock conflicts has met with success in the West. Conservation Northwest is supporting this tool and others in Washington.
Photo: Lisa Whiteman/NRDC










Living with Wolves

Having wolves back in our state and recovering them where they have been missing for decades is challenging. Yet wolves are the new normal, and 75% of Washington residents agree that we must learn to live with them. Can wolves and livestock share a landscape? The answer is 'yes.' Education and use of non-lethal tools for living with wolves are the next essential steps for wolf recovery in Washington. Read our latest newsletter to see what we are doing for wolves – and attend our living with wolves event on November 1.

Following the tragic removal of the Wedge Pack wolves, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Phil Anderson vowed to "refocus attention on working with livestock operators and conservation groups to aggressively promote the use of non-lethal tactics to avoid wolf-livestock conflict." One rancher in northeastern Washington is already using range riding, funded in part by Conservation Northwest.






Your generosity protects iconic Northwest wildlife and their habitats. Photo: Jasmine Minbashian

Your generosity protects iconic Northwest wildlife and their habitats.
Photo: Jasmine Minbashian





Double Your Giving Impact

To support the long-term recovery of lynx, wolverine, wolves, and other wildlife we partner with landowners to keep key private land in open space, as well as restore forests and protect wilderness in the Columbia Highlands. By November 30, you have an opportunity to double your impact through a $75,000 match and meet our deadline for protecting the Gotham Family Ranch, a vital piece of the Cascades to Rockies corridor. Thank you.

Did you know that heading to work helps protect wildlife and healthy ecosystems across the Northwest? From Microsoft to the state of Washington, all sorts of employers offer workplace giving campaign and many will double your impact with gift matching. Even small amounts from your paycheck add up quickly for wildlife and habitat. Our Wildland Partners program is another great way to make easy, monthly donations. Thanks again!






 

 

The proposed Pacific Gateway coal terminal promises endless coal trains, like this one moving through farm land south of Bellingham. Photo: Paul K. Anderson

The proposed Pacific Gateway coal terminal promises endless coal trains, like this one moving through farm land south of Bellingham.
Photo: Paul K. Anderson

 


How to Power Past Coal? Pack the House!

This Saturday, October 27 in Bellingham, is the first of several public environmental scoping sessions on a new deep-water coal terminal in northwestern Washington. Come to this first hearing (or to one of six other hearings around the state) to submit a comment and to testify. It's important that you voice your concerns!

If built, the Gateway Pacific Terminal at Cherry Point would be the largest coal terminal in North America, handling 48 million tons of coal per year. It provides the linchpin for coal exports to Asia and increased train and shipping traffic. The project puts people and wildlife at risk all along the coal transport route, affecting fragile ecosystems, including unique Cherry Point herring, and intensifying climate change and global warming.



 

 

A lynx caught by remote camera on the BC side of the Pasayten. Photo: Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project

A lynx caught on remote camera on the BC side of the Pasayten.
Photo: Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project

 

 

 

 


Lace Up Your Boots—Become a Wildlife Monitor

For a decade, Conservation Northwest has monitored rare wildlife in wild areas in Washington, catching glimpses of little-seen animals from lynx to wolf to wolverine. Join us on Flickr as we wrap up our 2012 summer/fall monitoring season with amazing images returned from the field, from our newest wolverine in the Upper Icicle Creek canyon of the Cascades to a video of Salmo Pack wolves near the Selkirks.

We still need winter monitoring volunteers – could that be you? Let Kit know! We will focus on winter detection of wolves and wolverines in the central and south Cascades.




 

 

 

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