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September 2012

Conservation Connection September 2012

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In this issue:

  • WA wolves update
  • Restoring I-90 crossing
  • Pathway to a park
  • Protecting the wild places


Wolf from the Strawberry Pack. A pack is defined as two or more wolves traveling together. Photo: Colville Confederated Tribes

Wolf from the Strawberry Pack. A pack is defined as two or more wolves traveling together.
Photo: Colville Confederated Tribes










Washington Wolves Update

Wolf update—Washington is now officially home to nine packs, with the latest pack confirmed this month on the Colville Reservation. Almost all of the packs seem to be faring well and have stayed clear of trouble with livestock this summer, with the exception of the Wedge Pack, located in the northeast corner of Washington between the Kettle River Range and Selkirk Mountains, just below the Canadian border.

Wolves in this pack have been involved in repeated depredation of calves belonging to the Diamond M Ranch. In the earliest incidents, experts could not agree that wolves were involved, and we urged the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to proceed cautiously. In the most recent incidents, however, all experts, including Carter Niemeyer, agree that members of the Wedge Pack were responsible. Meanwhile, WDFW has been trying unsuccessfully to reduce the pack in size by killing up to four of its members, while protecting the breeding pair.

While the future of this pack looks uncertain, one thing that is certain is that the best long-term solution is to reduce the chance of wolf-livestock conflicts occurring in the first place. Learn about lethal removal and proactive, non-lethal methods to deter wolves, including use of range riders.

Special event—On November 1 at 7 pm in Seattle, you're invited to a special screening of clips from the documentary film, "Land of the Lost Wolves," at the University of Washington's Kane Hall. Following the presentation will be a discussion panel featuring Conservation Northwest's Jasmine Minbashian, Bear Trek's Chris Morgan, and WDFW's Scott Fitkin. Join us for an evening for Washington's wolves!






You can help plant native vegetation to restore a Cascades wildlife crossing. Photo: Jen Watkins

You can help plant native vegetation to restore a Cascades wildlife crossing.
Photo: Jen Watkins





Restoring I-90's Gold Creek Wildlife Crossing

On Sept 29 and Oct 13, join us for Saturday work parties to plant more than 5,000 native plants and seeds around Gold Creek pond, east of Snoqualmie Pass along I-90. We'll be restoring habitat next to the new, Gold Creek wildlife underpasses. We need your brawn!

The Gold Creek valley is a tremendous recreational asset, providing an iconic picnic spot, accessible trail around Gold Creek pond, and launching pad to the Alpine Lakes Wilderness. It is also a vital movement corridor for wild animals traveling north and south through the Cascade Mountains. The freeway crossings help them do so safely and are part of the ongoing I-90 Project.






 

 

Stewart Mountain—the top of a proposed new park in the Lake Whatcom watershed and an excellent place for mountain biking. Photo: David Waugh

Stewart Mountain—the top of a proposed new park in the Lake Whatcom watershed and an excellent place for mountain biking.
Photo: David Waugh

 


Pathway to a New Forest Park

Supporters of a Lake Whatcom Forest Preserve Park packed a September 11 county council meeting. More than 200 supporters sported "A Park for All of Us" stickers and comments went on till nearly midnight. Thank you to all who attended! At the hearing, council members decided to postpone a park vote to October 9 to allow for consideration of a new proposal by Councilmember Sam Crawford that suggests shrinking the proposed park by about 20% by dropping the least environmentally sensitive lands outside the watershed.

A recent poll found 74% of local residents support reconveyance of lands for a new park that offers low-impact recreation, local control of natural resources, and old-growth forest for future generations. It's been a long haul but well worth getting there.



 

 

Wildlife need diverse and connected habitat. Photo: white-tailed deer fawn, commons.wikimedia.org

Wildlife need diverse and connected habitat.
Photo: white-tailed deer fawn, commons.wikimedia.org

 

 

 

 


Heading to Work, Protecting Wildlife

Do you wish you could work every day for the wild places you love? You can! Heading to work helps protect wildlife and healthy ecosystems across the Northwest with workplace giving campaigns. Having small donations held back from your paycheck every month really adds up for wolves, wolverines, and more. From Microsoft to the state of Washington, all sorts of employers have campaigns—please see our agency information. Many companies even double your impact with gift matching.

Don't work somewhere with a giving campaign or matching? As a Wildland Partner, you can maximize smaller monthly gifts with easy, automatic donations. Either way, you'll be making real changes for wildlife and wild places in the coming year. Thank you!




 

 

 

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