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Cascades grizzly bears get BC hotline

Jul 25, 2012

Jul 25 - This summer, call in your grizzly bear sightings to 1-855-GO GRIZZ! BC biologists and US counterparts hope to invest citizens in a similar vein through citizen science and monitoring. Hotline reports are screened by trained volunteers and forwarded on to BC biologists, who will follow up with field verification.

Cascades grizzly bears get BC hotline

A grizzly bear near Lillooet in southern BC. A new BC grizzly bear hotline goes live. Photo Dave Molenaar

Conservation Northwest has joined Canada's Hope Mountain Centre for Outdoor Learning, BC Nature, and other groups asking people recreating in southern BC to report their sightings of rare grizzly bears using the hotline, 1-855-GO-GRIZZ (1-855-464-7499).

Grizzly bears are rarer than you might think. For BC, the government estimates fewer than 35 grizzly bears live on the east slopes of the BC Coast Range and the Cascades in the area stretching from Lillooet to I-90 in Washington. That's a problem; grizzly bears are slow to reproduce and slow to recover from low numbers.

Look for it! A new poster at trailheads and retail outlets features the sightings hotline and how to distinguish grizzlies from black bears.

To request full size posters, see press release. Or download your own letter-size poster for printing and posting.

New sightings poster
New sightings poster

BC biologists and their US counterparts have worked together for years on grizzly bear science and recovery. Now the project groups hope to invest citizens in a similar vein through citizen science and monitoring. Hotline reports will be screened by trained volunteers and forwarded on to BC government biologists, who will follow up with field verification. Map of sightings area

“Every verified sighting contributes to our knowledge about SW BC’s grizzly bears, which in turn helps us understand how vulnerable they are to local extinction,” said Joe Scott, Conservation Northwest. “Hikers, climbers, hunters, fishers, photographers, loggers, and ranchers – anyone who is recreating or working in the mountains can contribute.”

At bearinfo.org/bc-bears on the Grizzly Bear Outreach Project website, you'll find more information.

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