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North Cascades

Conservation Northwest has long worked to protect, connect, and restore the lands in the North Cascades both east and west of the Cascade Crest.

Making connections in a wild place

Heliotrope Ridge. Photo James Johnson
Heliotrope Ridge. Photo James Johnson

One of three major ecological "hotspots" we focus on is the North Cascades. From Interstate 90 north to the Canadian border, the North Cascades of Washington provide some of the best habitat and wildlands in the Northwest. There's room for lots of wildlife, from wolves to grizzly bears.

News for Washington wolves
News on Cascades grizzly bears
News for Wolverines

Conservation Northwest has a long history of working on protecting, connecting, and restoring the lands in this ecoregion, from the dry ponderosa pine forests of the east Cascades to the huge Douglas fir and moist western hemlock stands on in the west Cascades.

Learn about the threatened North Cascades grizzly bear!

We have a long-term vision to connect and protect wildlife habitat in Washington. The Cascades Conservation Partnership, spearheaded by Conservation Northwest, was a four-year project (2000-2004) that inspired more than 16,000 people to give $16 million to protect 45,000 acres of checkerboard forest land lying between the Alpine Lakes and Mount Rainier.

Connecting wildlife habitat

A logical next step in connecting habitat in the greater North Cascades is to facilitate the movement of large mammals north to south within the state. A map of wildlife connectivity helps illustrate the movement of animals near Interstate 90. Conservation Northwest administers the I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition to help bridge that barrier for wildlife and ensure that under and overpasses are included in the I-90 Project to protect motorists and provide safe routes for bears, elk, and other wildlife through this part of the Cascades.

Partnering for Cascades wildlife

The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie and Okanogan-Wenatchee national forests are rich in wildlife and provide a wealth of recreation opportunities for millions of people. Conservation Northwest works on the ground with partners promoting sound science to protect, connect, and restore forests and wildlife in the North Cascades.

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