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2011 Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project Report

March-November 2011, the Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project captured thousands of photos of wild animals and documented wildlife at a total of 23 sites in the Olympic National Forest and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. All told in 2011, the monitoring project—a joint effort between Conservation Northwest, I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, and Wilderness Awareness School—marshaled 54 volunteers and more than 2,160 volunteer hours.

  • From March through November 2011, Conservation Northwest’s Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project documented wildlife at a total of 23 sites in the Olympic National Forest and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest.
  • During the monitoring season, we captured thousands of photos of wild animals, from rare carnivores like wolves to deer and elk and more.
  • All told in 2011, the monitoring project—a joint effort between Conservation Northwest, I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, and Wilderness Awareness School—marshaled 54 volunteers and more than 2,160 volunteer hours.
  • Read the full report, and appendices, in PDF form, below.
Olympics monitoring
Teanaway sunrise through elk antlers. CCWMP remote cam
Teanaway sunrise through elk antlers. CCWMP remote cam

This year, in the Olympics, three teams of citizen volunteers placed five remote cameras in three locations, in habitat

on Mount Ellinor, Mount Rose, and Mount Washington. The objective was to document pine marten in densely grown, high elevation forests selected by Olympic National Forest staff. Wildlife visited our cameras nine times, their motions triggering recorded images of black bear, bobcat, coyote, deer, and mountain goat. We did not record photos of our target species, pine marten, at any of the stations.

Cascades wildlife

In the Cascades, 14 volunteer teams placed 34 remote cameras in 20 locations resulting in thousands of images of wildlife. We focused the Cascades monitoring on two areas: 1) habitat near Interstate 90 (I-90) east of Snoqualmie Pass, an important wildlife movement corridor, and 2) habitat running north–south from Interstate 90 ranging from the Paysaten River drainage in Manning Park in British Columbia to the Manastash area south of Ellensburg, where sightings or habitat quality suggest the potential presence of a grey wolf or grizzly bear.

The results of the field season expanded what we know about the location, presence, and movement of wildlife in Washington’s Cascades.  It drew a lively image of these iconic landscapes by recording the presence of black bear, bobcat, cougar, coyote, deer, elk, grey wolf, lynx, and moose.

In the Okanogan, an additional pilot site was set up this year in coordination with Washington Department of Transportation to monitor wildlife presence in high roadkill and key habitat connectivity areas along Highway 97 north of Riverside. In the Okanogan Valley, one team deployed two cameras.

2011 Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project Report

The report is posted below in PDFs with appendices.

2011 Spring-Fall Report without appendices (1,343 KB)

Appendix A – CWMP Photos
Appendix B – CWMP Sample remote camera data sheet
Appendix C – CWMP Sample monitoring protocol
Appendix D – Species Priority List 

Visit our Flickr page to see photos and videos from our 2011 season, and view our YouTube video with season highlights!

Return to our main Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project page
 

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