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Sportsmen (and women!), hunting, and fair chase

Conservation Northwest supports the protection and restoration of habitat for all native wildlife (including carnivores). We also support science-based wildlife management and fair chase hunting according to the laws of the state of Washington.

Hunting and conservation can go hand in hand
Hunting and conservation can go hand in hand

For wildlife

Conservation Northwest supports the protection and restoration of habitat for all native wildlife, including predators. 

We also support science-based wildlife management and fair-chase hunting according to the laws of the state of Washington. In fact, we have several passionate hunters on our staff.

In 2015, we're partnering with organizations including the Mule Deer Foundation and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to protect and connect important habitat for mule deer, grouse and other species in north-central Washington through the Highway 97 / Working for Wildlife Initiative

For people

It's not just being "for" or "against" hunting. Those who hunt and those who don't hunt share much in common. Hunters and non-hunters alike enjoy the outdoors, care about local and sustainable food, relish hiking in fields and forests, and want to pass their knowledge on to younger generations.

Sportsmen like Teddy Roosevelt and Aldo Leopold were some our nation's first and most vocal conservationists, and their legacy lives on today. Most hunters have a deep respect for wild areas and choose to take their enjoyment further by becoming skilled at stalking and harvesting wild game animals.

For an excellent overview of the 'North American Model of Wildlife Conservation', which includes fair-chase hunting, public access, bans on wastage of meat, and conservation-oriented wildlife management, we encourage you to watch this video from the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership and author and TV personality Steven Rinella.

When hunting is based on the science of animal population management, is done under the rules of fair-chase, and hunters hunt lawfully and ethically, taking care of and respecting the animals they harvest, there doesn't have to be a "for" or "against" hunting attitude. It is just another important way some people choose to experience nature and wild places.

More on hunters and conservation 

A sportsman's ethic

Hunters take enormous pride not only in harvesting an animal in the field, but in properly cleaning and handling the game so that they and their families can enjoy some of the healthiest meat available anywhere. The recent movement to eat leaner, local and more sustainable meat and know where it comes from has been a common practice with hunters for many generations.

Hunting is an important way many choose to experience our natural heritage. Photo: Chase Gunnell
Hunting is an important way many choose to experience our natural heritage. Photo: Chase Gunnell

Despite many years of decline, including in Washington state, in the past decade participation in hunting has increased nationally, particularly among women and hunters hailing from urban areas. We hope this trend catches on in the Northwest and that the new generation of hunter-conservationists continues to grow.

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