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Can wolves and livestock share a landscape?

Can wolves and livestock share a landscape in Washington? It's been done elsewhere.

Rancher Joe Engelhart © Lisa Whiteman/NRDC
Rancher Joe Engelhart © Lisa Whiteman/NRDC
From the fall 2012 edition of the Conservation Northwest quarterly
by Jasmine Minbashian, special projects director, Bellingham

When I met Joe Engelhart, my first thought was that he is best dressed cowboy I had ever met. Nice leather work boots, clean and neatly pressed jeans, vest, kerchief, and a big broad hat. He looked more like the kind of guy you’d meet at a visitor’s center in traditional attire to show the public what a Canadian cowboy looks like. But after spending the day riding the range with Joe, I quickly learned that he was the real deal. And that his attire reflects the amount of pride he takes in his work.

What Conservation Northwest is doing for wolves in Washington
I had journeyed north from Washington State with a film crew from the British Broadcasting Company, to film a segment for the film documentary, Land of the Lost Wolves

I was in the small village of Longview, Alberta. Longview is best known for its view west toward the Canadian Rockies, for being a gateway to some stunning wild country, and for its cattle ranching heritage—producing some of the finest beef by most standards.

I had journeyed north from Washington State with a film crew from the British Broadcasting Company to film a segment for the film documentary, Land of the Lost Wolves. We were there to ask the question: Can wolves and livestock really share the landscape? Is killing wolves the best solution to wolf-livestock conflicts?

We had chosen Alberta as our destination because wolves here had never been fully eradicated. Yes, their numbers had dropped during the fierce extermination campaign of the last century, but they were never completely gone from the landscape. And most importantly it was major cattle country. Longview, a community built off cattle, has shared the landscape with wolves, grizzly bears, and several other big toothy creatures as long as the oldest man in town could remember. So I wanted to know: How did they do it? What was their strategy?...

Read more, pages 4-6
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