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Help recover America's wolves

By March 27, 2014, urge the Service to withdraw its proposal to remove Endangered Species Act protections for wolves in the lower 48 states and to recognize Washington’s Cascades and Pacific Coast wolves as a distinct, threatened population.

Help recover America's wolves

Washington's wolves, including this Wenatchee Pack wolf, are at a fragile stage. Photo © Craig Monette

Protect Wolves Returning to the Pacific Northwest

The US Fish and Wildlife Service in 2013 proposed a rule to remove Endangered Species Act protection for gray wolves in the most of the lower 48 states - including the Pacific Northwest. They reopened their public comment period on the proposal because a scientific peer review panel convened by the Service recently issued an unfavorable finding on the delisting proposal.

Please take action for wolves by March 27, 2014

Talking points:

  • Urge the Service to withdraw its proposal to remove Endangered Species Act protections for wolves in the lower 48 states.
  • Ask the Service to recognize Washington’s Cascades and Pacific Coast wolves as a distinct population and to list them as "threatened" species. This approach would allow all the aspects of state management plans to be implemented and provide higher poaching fines, while still providing meaningful protection where adequate state recovery plans are still lacking.
  • Wolves perform a complex but important role in maintaining wildlife diversity and ecosystem function around the American West.
  • Wolves west of the Rockies - like our Cascades wolves - are pretty scarce, and at a fragile stage. Loss of protection now could put at risk “seed” packs like the Teanaway and Wenatchee Packs that are critical to establishing a viable population in the Cascades and Coast. 
  • Washington does have a quality state plan that calls for recovery in the Cascades/Coast, but its penalties for poaching a wolf are minimal and subject to local politics. Without the more strict penalties that come with Endangered Species Act protection (up to $50,000 and a year in jail), discouraging illegal killing is much more of a challenge.

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