$7,500 reward offered after northeast Washington wolf killing

$7,500 reward offered after northeast Washington wolf killing

ConservationNWAdmin / May 31, 2019 / Poaching, Wolves

In response to news that a female gray wolf was apparently illegally killed last weekend in northeast Washington off Highway 20 near the Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge, near the territory of the Dirty Shirt Pack, Conservation Northwest issued the following statement:

“We’re glad that law enforcement are thoroughly investigating this apparent poaching case,” said Chase Gunnell, Conservation Northwest spokesperson. “To assist in bringing those responsible to justice, we’re offering a $7,500 reward for information that leads to a conviction.”

“Regardless of how people feel about wolves, illegally killing them is never an acceptable action,” said Gunnell. “Poaching can also undermine progress towards state wolf recovery goals, goals that many folks in northeast Washington are eager to meet.”

Through a Memorandum of Understanding with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Conservation Northwest offers standing rewards for those who provide information that leads to a poaching conviction in Washington state under the following circumstances:

  • Up to $7,500 for information helping to convict anyone who has illegally killed a wolf in Washington.
  • Up to $5,000 if a protected grizzly bear, wolverine, lynx, pronghorn, mountain caribou, or fisher was killed.
  • Up to $3,000 for egregious violations involving deer, elk, moose, or other iconic or threatened wildlife, such as spree killing.

Reward funds are provided by Conservation Northwest’s generous members and donors.

The wolf killed was wearing a tracking collar, and the body was recovered on May 27. Anyone with information should contact Captain Dan Rahn at WDFW’s regional office in Spokane at (509) 892-1001.

 

More information on our Reward Fund to Stop Poaching is AVAILABLE ON THIS PAGE. Want to support this program? MAKE A DONATION ONLINE
A wolf illegally killed in Whitman County, Washington in October 2014. Photo: WDFW